Recently in the Polar Research Category


Because the geological carbon cycle regulates long term atmospheric oxygen concentrations, fluctuations in atmospheric O2 are typically attributed to an imbalance between the weathering of organic carbon (OC) and reduced sulfur on land, a sink of atmospheric O2, and the burial of OC and reduced sulfur in marine sediments, a source of O2.

New research led by scientists from the University of Bristol has revealed new insights into how the microscopic algae that thrives along the edge of the Greenland Ice Sheet causes widespread darkening.

A new study led by ANU has found that animals and plants may live in warm caves under Antarctica's glaciers.

Cold seeps are places where hydrocarbons, mostly methane, emanate from the sea floor. Unlike the hydrothermal vents, the fluids and bubbles are no hotter than the surrounding seawater, thus the name.

Microbial Mats Adapting to the Cold

Researchers have identified the first cold-adaptation proteins found in microbial mats from Lake Joyce, a perennially ice-covered lake in Antarctica.

At the bottom of an icy Antarctic lake, a thin, slimy layer of bright green microbes is generating a tiny oasis of oxygen that might give a picture of what early Earth looked like before oxygen became common in the atmosphere.

Nearing the Limits of Life on Earth

It took Jackie Goordial over 1000 Petri dishes before she was ready to accept what she was seeing.

At the bottom of a frigid Antarctic lake, a thin layer of green slime is generating a little oasis of oxygen, a team including UC Davis researchers has found.

When a NASA spacecraft sets off to explore Jupiter's icy moon Europa to look for the ingredients of life, radar equipment designed to pierce the ice of Antarctica will be among the passengers.

Many view Antarctica as a frozen wasteland. Turns out there are hidden interconnected lakes underneath its dry valleys that could sustain life and shed light on ancient climate change.