Recently in the Meteorites, Asteroids, & Comets Category


A new study finds that Earth's water may have come from materials that were present in the inner solar system at the time the planet formed -- instead of far-reaching comets or asteroids delivering such water. The findings published Aug. 28 in Science suggest that Earth may have always been wet.

Chondrites are the likely building blocks of Earth, and identifying the group of chondrite that best represents Earth is a key to resolving the state of the early Earth.

Solar system materials are variably depleted in moderately volatile elements (MVEs) relative to the proto-solar composition.

Scientists have devised new analytical tools to break down the enigmatic history of Mars' atmosphere -- and whether life was once possible there.

Enstatite chondrites and aubrites are meteorites that show the closest similarities to the Earth in many isotope systems that undergo mass-independent and mass-dependent isotope fractionations.

Very occasionally, Earth gets bombarded by a large meteorite. But every day, our planet gets pelted by space dust, micrometeorites that collect on Earth's surface.

Stars have life cycles. They're born when bits of dust and gas floating through space find each other and collapse in on each other and heat up. They burn for millions to billions of years, and then they die.

A recent study has revealed new details about the composition and fragmentation of a meteorite reportedly discovered in the deserts of southwestern Morocco in 2012.

A recent study on the isotopic compositions of the South Byron Trio iron meteorite grouplet (SBT) shows that all three meteorites likely came from a single parent body that formed in the Solar nebula.

The evolution of the meteorite flux to the Earth can be studied by determining the terrestrial ages of meteorite collected in hot deserts.