Recently in the Biosignatures & Paleobiology Category


Humanity is on the threshold of being able to detect signs of alien life on other worlds. By studying exoplanet atmospheres, we can look for gases like oxygen and methane that only coexist if replenished by life.

We quantify the effects of refraction in transit transmission spectroscopy on spectral absorption features and on temporal variations that could be used to obtain altitude-dependent spectra for planets orbiting stars of different stellar types.

Detecting biomarkers, such as molecular oxygen, in the atmospheres of transiting exoplanets has been a major focus in the search for alien life.

The detection of strong thermochemical disequilibrium in the atmosphere of an extrasolar planet is thought to be a potential biosignature.

Researchers from the University of Cambridge have published details about how the first organisms on Earth could have become metabolically active.

The goal of finding and characterizing nearby Earth-like planets is driving many NASA high-contrast flagship mission concepts, the latest of which is known as the Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST).

When we send probes to other worlds (such as Mars) to look for evidence of past life, we are sending them to look for fossils.

A new study published recently in PNAS explores the relationship between the origin of animals and the oxygen content of the atmosphere.

How life arose from the toxic and inhospitable environment of our planet billions of years ago remains a deep mystery.

We developed an idealized two-column model to investigate the climate of tidally locked terrestrial planets with Earth-like atmospheres in the habitable zone of M-dwarf stars.