Recently in the Biosignatures & Paleobiology Category


When we send probes to other worlds (such as Mars) to look for evidence of past life, we are sending them to look for fossils.

A new study published recently in PNAS explores the relationship between the origin of animals and the oxygen content of the atmosphere.

How life arose from the toxic and inhospitable environment of our planet billions of years ago remains a deep mystery.

We developed an idealized two-column model to investigate the climate of tidally locked terrestrial planets with Earth-like atmospheres in the habitable zone of M-dwarf stars.

Astronomers at the University of Washington have developed a new method of gauging the atmospheric pressure of exoplanets, or worlds beyond the solar system, by looking for a certain type of molecule.

Although liquid water covers a majority of Earth's surface, scientists are still searching for planets outside of our solar system that contain water.

Astrobiologists supported by the NASA Astrobiology Institute have shown that mineral species on the early Earth may have been different than the ones found on our planet today.

The atmospheric composition of transiting exoplanets can be characterized during transit by spectroscopy.

Most models used to predict or fit exoplanet transmission spectra do not include all the effects of atmospheric refraction.

Organic haze plays a key role in many planetary processes ranging from influencing the radiation budget of an atmosphere to serving as a source of prebiotic molecules on the surface.