Recently in the Astrochemistry Category


Astronomers have mapped out the chemicals inside of planetary nurseries in extraordinary detail.

Small organic molecules, such as C2H, HCN, and H2CO, are tracers of the C, N, and O budget in protoplanetary disks.

The precursors to larger, biologically-relevant molecules are detected throughout interstellar space, but determining the presence and properties of these molecules during planet formation requires observations of protoplanetary disks at high angular resolution and sensitivity

It is speculated that there might be some linkage between interstellar aldehydes and their corresponding alcohols. Here, an observational study and astrochemical modeling are coupled together to illustrate the connection between them.

We present the first determination of the abundance ratios of 13C substitutions of cyanoacetylene (HC3N), [H13CCCN]:[HC13CCN]:[HCC13CN] in Titan's atmosphere measured using millimeter-wave spectra obtained by the Atacama Large Millimeter-submillimeter Array.

Stellar systems are often formed through the collapse of dense molecular clouds which, in turn, return copious amounts of atomic and molecular material to the interstellar medium. An in-depth understanding of chemical evolution during this cyclic interaction between the stars and the interstellar medium is at the heart of astrochemistry.

Peptide bonds, as the molecular bridges that connect amino acids, are crucial to the formation of proteins. Searches and studies of molecules with embedded peptide-like bonds are thus important for the understanding of protein formation in space.

Two asteroids (203 Pompeja and 269 Justitia) have been discovered with a redder spectrum (※1) than any other object in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter.

We predict that cyanoacetylene (HC3N) is produced photochemically in the atmosphere of GJ 1132 b in abundances detectable by the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), assuming that the atmosphere is as described by Swain et al. (2021).

Context. The molecular composition of interstellar ice mantles is defined by gas-grain processes in molecular clouds, with the main components being H2O, CO, and CO2. CH3OH ice is detected towards the denser regions, where large amounts of CO freeze out and get hydrogenated.