Recently in the Genomics and Cell Biology Category

Tardigrades, nearly microscopic animals that can survive the harshest of environments, including outer space, hold the record for the animal that has the most foreign DNA

Life is quirky. Although the molecules that make up all living things obey physical and chemical laws, they do so with a puzzling twist.

Evidence that Viruses are Alive

Their diversity makes viruses difficult to classify. A new study uses protein folds as evidence that viruses are living entities that belong on their own branch of the tree of life.

Tree of Life for 2.3 Million Species Released

A first draft of the "tree of life" for the roughly 2.3 million named species of animals, plants, fungi and microbes -- from platypuses to puffballs -- has been released.

Scientists have captured the first detailed microscopy images of ultra-small bacteria that are believed to be about as small as life can get.

Hydrogen peroxide -- commonly used as hair bleach -- may have provided the energy source for the development of life on Earth, two applied mathematicians have found.

Self-organizing processes in chemical reaction/precipitation systems can lead to a variety of complex structures, including chemical gardens and inorganic membranes.

Together with colleagues from Uppsala University in Sweden and the University of Vienna in Austria, Steffen Leth Jrgensen from the Centre for Geobiology at the University of Bergen (UiB) has published the article Complex Archaea that bridge the gap between prokaryotes and eukaryotes in Nature, presenting the discovery of this new microbe.

The self-organization properties of DNA-like molecular fragments four billion years ago may have guided their own growth into repeating chemical chains long enough to act as a basis for primitive life, says a new study by the University of Colorado Boulder and the University of Milan.

Ideas about directing evolution of life forms on Earth and finding life on other planets are rapidly morphing from science-fiction fantasy into mainstream science, says David Lynn, a chemist at Emory University.