Recently in the Plant Biology Category


The genes that first enabled plants to grow shoots and conquer the land have been identified by University of Bristol researchers.

One of the most important events in evolutionary history occurred around 500 million years ago with the spread of plant life from water to land.

As the world urbanizes and technologies such as LED grow lights bring down costs, indoor farming is becoming an increasingly important part of the food supply. Eventually, indoor farming techniques could help humans maintain a healthy diet in space.

Arguably, the greatest fueler of life on our planet is photosynthesis, but understanding its labyrinthine chemistry, powered by sunlight, is challenging. Researchers recently illuminated some new steps inside the molecular factory that makes the oxygen we breathe.

By studying liverworts - which diverged from other land plants early in the history of plant evolution - researchers from the Sainsbury Laboratory at the University of Cambridge have found that the relationship between plants and filamentous microbes not only dates back millions of years, but that modern plants have maintained this ancient mechanism to accommodate and respond to microbial invaders.

For the first four billion years of Earth's history, our planet's continents would have been devoid of all life except microbes.

The world's oldest algae fossils are a billion years old, according to a new analysis by earth scientists at McGill University.

Does Eclipse Equal Night In Plant Life?

On August 21, 2017, about 215 million American adults watched one of nature's most dramatic events: a total solar eclipse. However, most of the country could only see a partial eclipse.

Every day, enough sunlight hits the Earth to power the planet many times over -- if only we could more efficiently capture all the energy.

The ~1.6 Ga Tirohan Dolomite of the Lower Vindhyan in central India contains phosphatized stromatolitic microbialites. We report from there uniquely well-preserved fossils interpreted as probable crown-group rhodophytes (red algae).