Recently in the Radiation Category

The most Earth-like planet could have been made uninhabitable by vast quantities of radiation, new research led by the University of Warwick research has found.

Astrophysical ionizing radiation events such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth.

Earth-like planets orbiting close to small stars probably have magnetic fields that protect them from stellar radiation and help maintain surface conditions that could be conducive to life.

Studies find airplane crews at high altitude are exposed to potentially harmful levels of radiation from cosmic rays.

The onset and nature of the earliest geomagnetic field is important for understanding the evolution of the core, atmosphere and
life on Earth.

Astrophysical ionizing radiation events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth, primarily through depletion of stratospheric ozone and subsequent increase in surface-level solar ultraviolet radiation.

As a copious source of gamma-rays, a nearby Galactic Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) can be a threat to life.

In this work, we studied the stability of the glycine molecule in the crystalline zwitterion form, known as {alpha}-glycine (+ NH3 CH2 COO− ) under action of heavy cosmic ray analogs.

Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) may constitute a large fraction of the matter in the Universe.

If you have been watching the new series "Cosmos" recently then you have see Tardigrades or "water bears" featured. These creatures are remarkably resistant to a wide range of conditions that humans would consider extreme - if not deadly.