Recently in the Habitable Zones & Global Climate Category


The study of cosmology, galaxy formation and exoplanetary systems has now advanced to a stage where a cosmic inventory of terrestrial planets may be attempted.

Terrestrial planets formed within gaseous protoplanetary disks can accumulate significant hydrogen envelopes.

Why did the emergence of our species require a timescale similar to the entire habitable period of our planet?

The ubiquity of M dwarfs, combined with the relative ease of detecting terrestrial-mass planets around them, has made them prime targets for finding and characterising planets in the "Habitable Zone" (HZ).

"A globular cluster might be the first place in which intelligent life is identified in our galaxy," says lead author Rosanne Di Stefano of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA).

Secular and mean motion resonances (hearafter MMR) are effective perturbations to shape planetary systems.

The planet, more than four times the mass of the Earth, is one of three that the team detected around a red dwarf star called Wolf 1061.

Is the Pale Blue Dot Unique?

The next generation of ground and space-based telescopes will image habitable planets around nearby stars. A growing literature describes how to characterize such planets with spectroscopy, but less consideration has been given to the usefulness of planet colors.

Life on other planets? A recent study by UNLV astrophysicist Jason Steffen is shedding new light on this persistently challenging question.

Inspired by the close-proximity pair of planets in the Kepler-36 system, we consider two effects that may have important ramifications for the development of life in similar systems where a pair of planets may reside entirely in the habitable zone of the hosting star.