Recently in the Habitable Zones & Global Climate Category


We report magnetic field measurements for Kappa1~Cet, a proxy of the young Sun when life arose on Earth.

Star-like objects with effective temperatures of less than 2,700 kelvin are referred to as ultracool dwarfs.

We investigate how night side cooling and surface friction impact surface temperatures and large scale circulation for tidally locked Earth-like planets.

Astronomers at KU Leuven, Belgium, have shown that the interaction between the surface and the atmosphere of an exoplanet has major consequences for the temperature on the planet.

Should we expect most habitable planets to share the Earth's marbled appearance? Terrestrial planets within the habitable zone are thought to display a broad range of water compositions, due to the stochastic nature of water delivery.

The Habitability of Venus and Earth

If conditions had been just a little different an eon ago, there might be plentiful life on Venus and none on Earth.

One of the most fundamental topics of exobiology concerns the identification of stars with environments consistent with life. Although it is believed that most types of main-sequence stars might be able to support life, particularly extremophiles, special requirements appear to be necessary for the development and sustainability of advanced life forms.

Water is necessary for life as we know it, but too much water is bad for habitability.

New research has revealed that fewer than predicted planets may be capable of harbouring life because their atmospheres keep them too hot.

The habitable zone (HZ) describes the range of orbital distances around a star where the existence of liquid water on the surface of an Earth-like planet is in principle possible.