Recently in the Astrogeology Category


We carried out wind tunnel experiments on parabolic flights with 100 μm Mojave Mars simulant sand. The experiments result in shear stress thresholds and erosion rates for varying g-levels at 600 Pa pressure.

Oxygen fugacity is a measure of rock oxidation that influences planetary structure and evolution. Most rocky bodies in the Solar System formed at oxygen fugacities approximately five orders of magnitude higher than a hydrogen-rich gas of solar composition.

Volatile molecules are critical to habitability, yet difficult to observe directly at the optically thick midplanes of protoplanetary disks, where planets form.

The increasing number of newly detected exoplanets at short orbital periods raises questions about their formation and migration histories.

The Moon-forming giant impact extensively melts and partially vaporizes the silicate Earth and delivers a substantial mass of metal to Earth's core.

A day is the time for Earth to make one complete rotation on its axis, a year is the time for Earth to make one revolution around the Sun -- reminders that basic units of time and periods on Earth are intimately linked to our planet's motion in space relative to the Sun. In fact, we mostly live our lives to the rhythm of these astronomical cycles.

The quest to discover what drove one of the most important evolutionary events in the history of life on Earth has taken a new, fascinating twist.

Chemical analyses of meteorites allow for a better estimation of the chemical composition of the Earth and its potential building blocks.

The first minerals to form in the universe were nanocrystalline diamonds, which condensed from gases ejected when the first generation of stars exploded.

The poor stickiness of silicate dust grains is a major obstacle to the formation of rocky planetesimals.