Recently in the Oceanic Research Category


When it comes to exploring exoplanets, it may be wise to take a snorkel along. A new study, published in a paper in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, has used a statistical model to predict that most habitable planets may be dominated by oceans spanning over 90% of their surface area.

A new study led by The Australian National University (ANU) has found seawater cycles throughout the Earth's interior down to 2,900 km (1,800 miles), much deeper than previously thought, reopening questions about how the atmosphere and oceans formed.

From Monterey Bay to Europa

If you think operating a robot in space is hard, try doing it in the ocean. Saltwater can corrode your robot and block its radio signals. Kelp forests can tangle it up, and you might not get it back. Sharks will even try to take bites out of its wings.

Vital Signs: Seismology of Ocean Worlds

Ice covered ocean worlds are probably seismically active. Measuring that activity can provide information about global and local habitability.

As scientists continue finding evidence for life in the ocean more than 3 billion years ago, those ancient fossils pose a paradox.

We consider super-Earth sized planets which have a water mass fraction that is large enough to form an external mantle composed of high pressure water ice polymorphs and that lack a substantial H/He atmosphere.

A geologist from the University of Aberdeen is taking part in an ocean expedition that aims to discover how far beneath the Earth life can survive.

Should we expect most habitable planets to share the Earth's marbled appearance? Terrestrial planets within the habitable zone are thought to display a broad range of water compositions, due to the stochastic nature of water delivery.

A new NASA study modeling conditions in the ocean of Jupiter's moon Europa suggests that the necessary balance of chemical energy for life could exist there, even if the moon lacks volcanic hydrothermal activity.

A Closer Look At Titan's Methane Seas

Saturn's largest moon is covered in seas and lakes of liquid hydrocarbons and one sea has now been found to be filled with pure methane, with a seabed covered by a sludge of organic-rich material, and possibly surrounded by wetlands.