Recently in the Oceanic Research Category


New research from a University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science-led science team provides new insight into one of the world's most diverse and extensive ecosystems of living microbes.

At the bottom of an icy Antarctic lake, a thin, slimy layer of bright green microbes is generating a tiny oasis of oxygen that might give a picture of what early Earth looked like before oxygen became common in the atmosphere.

Water On - and In - Terrestrial Planets

Earth has a unique surface character among Solar System worlds. Not only does it harbor liquid water, but also large continents.

Water covers more than two-thirds of Earth's surface, but its exact origins are still something of a mystery.

Earliest Jurassic Corals Discovered

Five times in Earth's history mass extinction events have wiped out up to 90 percent of global life.

Ancient rocks harbored microbial life deep below the seafloor, reports a team of scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Virginia Tech, and the University of Bremen.

One of the key necessities for life on our planet is electricity. That's not to say that life requires a plug and socket, but everything from shrubs to ants to people harnesses energy via the transfer of electrons -- the basis of electricity.

At the bottom of the sea, volcanic and magmatic forces create hot springs that spew super-heated water into the deep ocean.

The prospect of finding ocean-bearing exoplanets has been boosted, thanks to a pioneering new study. An international team of scientists, including from the University of Exeter, has discovered an immense cloud of hydrogen escaping from a Neptune-sized exoplanet.

In 2009, scientists from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution embarked on a NASA-funded mission to the Mid-Cayman Rise in the Caribbean, in search of a type of deep-sea hot-spring or hydrothermal vent that they believed held clues to the search for life on other planets.