Recently in the Oceanic Research Category


Habitability of Water Worlds

There are four different stable climate states for pure water atmospheres, as might exist on so-called "waterworlds".

"Who in his wildest dreams could have imagined that, beneath the crust of our Earth, there could exist a real ocean...a sea that has given shelter to species unknown?"

NASA's Cassini spacecraft has provided scientists the first clear evidence that Saturn's moon Enceladus exhibits signs of present-day hydrothermal activity which may resemble that seen in the deep oceans on Earth.

In this paper we present a series of models for the deep water cycle on super-Earths experiencing plate tectonics.

Super-Earths Have Long-Lasting Oceans

For life as we know it to develop on other planets, those planets would need liquid water, or oceans.

Life on an Aquaplanet

An MIT study finds an exoplanet, tilted on its side, could still be habitable if covered in ocean.

A new study is helping to answer a longstanding question that has recently moved to the forefront of earth science: Did our planet make its own water through geologic processes, or did water come to us via icy comets from the far reaches of the solar system?

New research published today in the journal Astrobiology shows the vital role of oceans in moderating climate on Earth-like planets.

Roy Price first heard about the hydrothermal vents in New Caledonia's Bay of Prony a decade ago. Being a scuba diver and a geologist, he was fascinated by the pictures of a 38-meter-high calcite "chimney" that had precipitated out of the highly-alkaline vent fluid.

Researchers from the University of New Mexico and Northwestern University report evidence for potentially oceans worth of water deep beneath the United States. Though not in the familiar liquid form - the ingredients for water are bound up in rock deep in the Earth's mantle - the discovery may represent the planet's largest water reservoir.