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Habitable Zones & Global Climate: October 2017


We consider the habitability of Earth-analogs around stars of different masses, which is regulated by the stellar lifetime, stellar wind-induced atmospheric erosion, and biologically active ultraviolet (UV) irradiance.

Variations in the axial tilt, or obliquity, of terrestrial planets can affect their climates and therefore their habitability.

In an attempt to select stars that can host planets with characteristics similar to our own, we selected seven solar-type stars known to host planets in the habitable zone and for which spectroscopic stellar parameters are available.

Semidiurnal atmospheric thermal tides are important for terrestrial exoplanets in the habitable zone of their host stars.

Astrophysical observations reveal a large diversity of radii and masses of exoplanets. It is important to characterize the interiors of exoplanets to understand planetary diversity and further determine how unique, or not, Earth is.

Aims. We study the formation and water delivery of planets in the habitable zone (HZ) around solar-type stars. In particular, we study different dynamical environments that are defined by the most massive body in the system.

We investigate the atmospheric dynamics of terrestrial planets in synchronous rotation near the inner edge of the habitable zone of low-mass stars using the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM).

We derive fitting formulae for the quick determination of the existence of S-type and P-type habitable zones in binary systems.

We combine inferred galaxy properties from a semi-analytic galaxy evolution model incorporating dark matter halo merger trees with new estimates of supernova and gamma ray burst rates as a function of metallicity from stellar population synthesis models incorporating binary interactions.

Eccentricity is an important orbital parameter. Understanding its effect on planetary climate and habitability is critical for us to search for a habitable world beyond our solar system.

The oxidation of rocky planet surfaces and atmospheres, which arises from the twin forces of stellar nucleosynthesis and gravitational differentiation, is a universal process of key importance to habitability and exoplanet biosignature detection.