Recently in the SETI Category


Searching For A Standard Drake Equation

In the 20th century the scientific search for extraterrestrial intelligence began, and the Drake equation was proposed to estimate the number of extraterrestrial species humanity could attempt to detect, N.

The star EPIC 249706694 (HD 139139) was found to exhibit 28 transit-like events over an 87 day period during the Kepler mission's K2 Campaign 15 (Rappaport et al. 2019).

A radio transmitter which is accelerating with a non-zero radial component with respect to a receiver will produce a signal that appears to change its frequency over time. This effect, commonly produced in astrophysical situations where orbital and rotational motions are ubiquitous, is called a drift rate.

We analyze the potential transit light curve effects due to a Clarke belt of satellites around an exoplanet.

Looking for Lurkers: A New Way to Do SETI

The most recently discovered group of rocky bodies nearby Earth are termed co-orbital objects. An attractive location for extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI) to locate a probe to observe Earth throughout our deep past are the co-orbital objects.

Allen Telescope Array Upgrade Program Funded

The SETI Institute announced a new gift by Qualcomm founder Franklin Antonio that funds the first phase of a 3-year initiative to revitalize the Allen Telescope Array (ATA).

We present modeled detection limits of the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) and the Wide-Field Infrared Space Telescope (WFIRST) to an optical and infrared laser which could be used by an extraterrestrial civilization to signal their presence.

In this work, we motivate, describe, and announce a living bibliography for academic papers and other works published in the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI).

Technosignatures in Transit

Kepler, K2, TESS, and similar time-domain photometric projects, while designed with exoplanet detection in mind, are also well-suited projects for searches for large artificial structures orbiting other stars in the Galaxy.

WISE, Gaia, and JWST provide an opportunity to compute the first robust upper limits on the energy supplies of extraterrestrial civilizations, both for stars in the Galaxy (Kardashev Type II civilizations) and for other galaxies (Kardashev Type III civilizations).