Recently in the Astrobiology (general) Category


The huge forces generated by the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories are being used to replicate the gravitational pressures on so-called "super-Earths" to determine which might maintain atmospheres that could support life.

The capacity to sense gradients efficiently and acquire information about the ambient environment confers many advantages like facilitating movement toward nutrient sources or away from toxic chemicals.

Keith's note: I have known John Rummel for 35 years. I first worked with him at the old Life Science Division at NASA Headquarters. He has made an indelible mark on NASA's search for life in the universe. Please consider making a donation to help out John and his family in this time of need.

Researchers have found that rocky exoplanets which formed early in the life of the galaxy seem to have had a greater chance of developing a magnetic field and plate tectonics than planets which formed later.

Humans have been wondering whether we alone in the universe since antiquity.

Giant elliptical galaxies are not as likely as previously thought to be cradles of technological civilizations such as our own, according to a recent paper by a University of Arkansas astrophysicist.

Astrobiology has been gaining increasing scientific prominence and public attention as the search for life beyond Earth continues to make significant headway on multiple fronts. In view of these recent developments, the fascinating and dynamic etymology of astrobiology is elucidated, and thus shown to encompass a plethora of vivid characters drawn from different continents, religions, ideologies and centuries.

To help answer one of the great existential questions--how did life begin?--a new study combines biological and cosmological models. Professor Tomonori Totani from the Department of Astronomy looked at how life's building blocks could spontaneously form in the universe--a process known as abiogenesis.

NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD) has an extensive Program Officers list of contact information for all of its research programs. Virtually everything SMD does has a contact listed - except Astrobiology. The word is not mentioned at all - even though many of its sub topics are mentioned. NASA issues research solicitations for "Astrobiology" yet they can't be bothered to tell people who to contact for the programs managed under "Astrobiology" at NASA?

The National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine along with the NASA Science Mission Directorate have reached consensus on the Statement of Task for the next decadal survey in planetary science and astrobiology. The Statement of Task will serve as a guiding document for the Planetary Science and Astrobiology Decadal Survey 2023-2032.