Recently in the Astrobiology (general) Category


Now that we know that Earth-like planets are ubiquitous in the universe, as well as that most of them are much older than the Earth, it is justified to ask to what extent evolutionary outcomes on other such planets are similar, or indeed commensurable, to the outcomes we perceive around us.

How do we understand the significance of new scientific results related to the search for life? When would we be able to say, "yes, extraterrestrial life has been found?"

The Fine-Tuning of the Universe for Life

When a physicist says that a theory is fine-tuned, they mean that it must make a suspiciously precise assumption in order to explain a certain observation.

Dear Astrobiology Community: We at NASA Astrobiology are continuing to prioritize thoughts and efforts in justice, equity, and belonging. We are seeking your inputs at this time on several fronts toward building momentum for growth, change, and action... for ourselves and our beloved community.

Ours could realistically be the generation to discover evidence of life beyond Earth. With this privileged potential comes responsibility. The magnitude of the question, "are we alone?", and the public interest therein, opens the possibility that results may be taken to imply more than the observations support, or than the observers intend.

Dear Astrobiologists, NASA has released a Request for Information (RFI) related to the newly announced "Mission Equity," soliciting input from the public on topics of diversity, equity, and inclusion

Are we alone in the universe? So far, the only life we know of is right here on Earth. But here at NASA, we're looking.   

The Astrobiology Science Conference (AbSciCon) is a community-organized conference that provides a forum for reporting on new discoveries, sharing data and insights, advancing collaborative efforts and initiating new ones, planning new projects, and educating the next generation of astrobiologists.

In Kevin Hand's "Alien Oceans: The Search For Life In The Depths Of Space" we learn that Earth is just one example of a myriad ways that a world can have an ocean. And searching for life on other ocean worlds requires a combination of old tools and new approaches to using those tools.

We live on an ocean world with 71% its surface covered by a water. For all of history humans had an intrinsic bias that all inhabited worlds would have large oceans - since we do. Indeed, the large flat plains of our Moon still bear names of imaginary seas based on that bias and early telescopes. That said we held to the notion that life would arise on a world if only it had Earth's basic characteristics - one of which was large bodies of water. Well, we now know that there is more than one way to have a planet with lots of liquid water.

The huge forces generated by the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories are being used to replicate the gravitational pressures on so-called "super-Earths" to determine which might maintain atmospheres that could support life.