Recently in the Astrobiology (general) Category


NASA Television will air a panel discussion of leading science and engineering experts on Monday, July 14, from 2 to 3:30 p.m. EDT, who will describe the scientific and technological roadmap that will lead to the discovery of potentially habitable worlds among the stars.

After more than two months on national televison NASA's Astrobiology Insitute has yet to utter a single word about "Cosmos". This is baffling. It is also simply unacceptable.

The question of whether we share the universe with other intelligent beings is of long standing.

SETI experiments are trying to determine whether other intelligent, technologically capable, life exists in the universe, to answer the question "Are we alone?" or "Is anybody out there?"

Next week (21 May) there will be a hearing held by the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology titled "Astrobiology and the Search for Life in the Universe".

This week, twenty European scientists will gather at Boulby mine in the UK to begin testing technologies for the exploration of Mars and hunting for deep subsurface life that will aid scientists in their search for extraterrestrial life.

The 10th Annual Astrobiology Graduate Conference (AbGradCon), an interdisciplinary conference organized by and for graduate students and early career scientists, will be held at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, NY during July 27 - 31, 2014.

NASA's Astrobiology program continues to totally ignore "Cosmos" - even when it offers millions of viewers a full episode on Astrobiology.

COSMOS Then and Now

The new incarnation of "COSMOS" hosted by Neil deGrasse Tyson debuted the other night. Highly anticipated, this new effort seeks to reboot, rekindle, and revitalize the indelible impression that its predecessor, hosted by Carl Sagan, made on many of us back in 1980.

Last night @NASA and other main NASA Twitter accounts devoted a lot of real time tweeting and linking of images and references in support of the premiere of "Cosmos".