Recently in the Astrobiology (general) Category

The Baruch S. Blumberg NASA/Library of Congress Astrobiology Program establishes a focus in the nation's capital for the exploration of issues surrounding life's future in the universe, for humans and other species, on Earth and beyond.

Over the past two years 800 members of the astrobiology community have contributed, through in person meetings, white papers, a series of webinars and reviews, to define a new strategy for the next decade of astrobiology research. Mary Voytek, the Senior Scientist for Astrobiology, and Michael New, the Astrobiology Discipline Scientist, described the goal of the endeavor to create an "inspirational and aspirational" document. The strategy will replace the 2008 Astrobiology Roadmap.

Today the House Science, Space, and Technology Committee helad a hearing that reviewed the scientific methods employed to search for life, examine recent scientific discoveries in the field of astrobiology (the study of the origin, evolution, distribution, and future of life in the universe), and assess the prospects of finding life beyond Earth over the next decade.

Tree of Life for 2.3 Million Species Released

A first draft of the "tree of life" for the roughly 2.3 million named species of animals, plants, fungi and microbes -- from platypuses to puffballs -- has been released.

We only have one example of a planet with life: Earth. But within the next generation, it should become possible to detect signs of life on planets orbiting distant stars.

You might know it as a drink for hipsters or as an ancient brew drunk for centuries in Eurasia, but the culture that ferments sugary tea into Kombucha is going around the world. Bolted to the outside of the International Space Station are the same bacteria and yeasts that are used in making Kombucha.

Self-organizing processes in chemical reaction/precipitation systems can lead to a variety of complex structures, including chemical gardens and inorganic membranes.

Learn about planets beyond our solar system, far-flung missions and possible life in the cosmos at "(un)Discovered Worlds," a one-day Cornell University space sciences conference, May 9, to inaugurate the new Institute for Pale Blue Dots.

Research by New York University Biology Professor Michael Rampino concludes that Earth's infrequent but predictable path around and through our Galaxy's disc may have a direct and significant effect on geological and biological phenomena occurring on Earth.

Astrobiology and the Search for Extraterrestrial Life by The University of Edinburgh. Self-paced online course.