Archives

Habitable Zones & Global Climate: November 2015


Inspired by the close-proximity pair of planets in the Kepler-36 system, we consider two effects that may have important ramifications for the development of life in similar systems where a pair of planets may reside entirely in the habitable zone of the hosting star.

Rotation in planetary atmospheres plays an important role in regulating atmospheric and oceanic heat flow, cloud formation and precipitation.

A terrestrial planet in an orbit far outside of the standard habitable zone could maintain surface liquid water as a result of H2-H2 collision-induced absorption by a thick H2 atmosphere.

The most Earth-like planet could have been made uninhabitable by vast quantities of radiation, new research led by the University of Warwick research has found.

Earth has a unique surface character among Solar System worlds. Not only does it harbor liquid water, but also large continents.

M-dwarf stars are generally considered favourable for rocky planet detection. However, such planets may be subject to extreme conditions due to possible high stellar activity.

The system of four planets around HR8799 offers a unique opportunity to probe the physics and chemistry at play in the atmospheres of self-luminous young (~30 Myr) planets.

Circumbinary planets whose orbits become unstable may be ejected, accreted, or even captured by one of the stars.

Water covers more than two-thirds of Earth's surface, but its exact origins are still something of a mystery.

An atmospheric haze around a faraway planet -- like the one which probably shrouded and cooled the young Earth -- could show that the world is potentially habitable, or even be a sign of life itself.

A key component of characterizing multi-planet exosystems is testing the orbital stability based on the observed properties.