Archives

Extrasolar Planets: May 2014


Some Sun-like stars are 'Earth-eaters.' During their development they ingest large amounts of the rocky material from which 'terrestrial' planets like Earth, Mars and Venus are made.

We present the characterization of the Kepler-93 exoplanetary system, based on three years of photometry gathered by the Kepler spacecraft.

The composition of planets is largely determined by the chemical and dynamical evolution of the disk during planetesimal formation and growth.

The spin-rotation of a planet arises from the accretion of angular momentum during its formation, but the details of this process are still unclear.

Exoplanet transit events are attractive targets for the ultrahigh-resolution capabilities afforded by optical interferometers.

Variations related to stellar activity and correlated noise can prevent the detections of low-amplitude signals in radial velocity data if not accounted for.

Several studies, observational and theoretical, suggest that planetary systems with only rocky planets should be the most common in the Universe.

The dynamics of systems of two and three planets, initially placed on circular and nearly coplanar orbits, is explored in the proximity of their stability limit.

A tidally-locked planet in its orbit around a star keeps the same face towards the star. This happens when the rotation period of the planet around its own axis becomes equal to its revolution period around the star.

Circumbinary planets have been the subject of much recent work, providing both simulations and new discoveries. We present the first observationally based determination of the rate of occurrence of these planets.