Recently in the Biochemistry Category


The Origins Of Metabolism

Sheding light on one of the most enduring mysteries of science: How did metabolism - the process by which life powers itself by converting energy from food into movement and growth - begin?

One element is the backbone of all forms of life we've ever discovered on Earth: carbon.

A recent study explores the potential for diamidophosphate (DAP) to form naturally on the early Earth.

New research has identified manganese as an unsung hero in the evolution of life on Earth, as it enabled a form of pre-oxygen photosynthesis and helped protect against cellular oxidation.

A new study provides deeper insight into the chemical and isotopic signatures in Earth's geological record by resurrecting ancient enzymes to better understand the processes by which they were formed.

Discovering new biological targets is a critical part of our ongoing battle against diseases. Over the years, scientists have made impressive progress towards the understanding of biological systems, constantly identifying novel targets.

Prebiotic Synthesis of RNA Nucleotides

RNA was probably the first informational molecule. Now chemists from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have demonstrated that alternation of wet and dry conditions could have sufficed to drive the prebiotic synthesis of the RNA nucleosides found in all domains of life.

Chemists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found a compound that may have been a crucial factor in the origins of life on Earth.

Every day, enough sunlight hits the Earth to power the planet many times over -- if only we could more efficiently capture all the energy.

Life exists in a myriad of wondrous forms, but if you break any organism down to its most basic parts, it's all the same stuff: carbon atoms connected to hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen and other elements.