Hydrogenated Fullerenes (Fulleranes) in Space


The theoretical spectra of C60Hm computed from a thermal excitation model, where the temperature is assumed to be 300 K. The m values are marked on the up-left corner. A feature around 15 µm appears, as marked by the vertical dashed lines

Since the first laboratory synthesis of C60 in 1985, fullerene-related species have been proposed to interpret various astronomical features. After more than 25 years' efforts, several circumstellar and interstellar features have been convincingly assigned to C60, C70, and C+60.


These successes resulted from the recent advancements in observational, experimental, as well as computational techniques, and re-stimulated interest in searching for fullerene derivatives in space. As one of the most important fullerene derivatives, hydrogenated fullerene (fullerane) is likely to exist in circumstellar and interstellar conditions.

This review gives an overview of the chemical properties and spectral signals of fulleranes focusing on those relevant to astronomy. We summarize previous proposals of fulleranes as the carrier of astronomical features at UV, optical, infrared, and radio wavelengths, and discuss the arguments favoring or disfavoring the presence of fulleranes in astronomical environments. Although no unambiguous detection of fulleranes in space has yet been reported, there are plausible evidences for supporting the formation of certain fullerane isomers.

Yong Zhang, Seyedabdolreza Sadjadi, Chih-Hao Hsia
(Submitted on 14 Apr 2020)
Comments: 10 pages, 3 figures, invited review article for a special issue of Astrophys. Space Sci. devoted to "Unexplained Spectral Phenomena in the ISM"
Subjects: Solar and Stellar Astrophysics (astro-ph.SR); Astrophysics of Galaxies (astro-ph.GA)
Cite as: arXiv:2004.06256 [astro-ph.SR] (or arXiv:2004.06256v1 [astro-ph.SR] for this version)
Submission history
From: Yong Zhang
[v1] Tue, 14 Apr 2020 01:17:30 UTC (209 KB)
https://arxiv.org/abs/2004.06256
Astrobiology, Astrochemistry

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