GSA session T96 "Planetary Pummelling: Cataclysmic Bombardment of the Solar System as Catastrophe, Catalyst, Cauldron and Crucible"

Co-chairs: Dr. Barbara Cohen (Barbara.A.Cohen@nasa.gov) Dr. Stephen Mojzsis (mojzsis@colorado.edu)

Even as we approach the 40th anniversary of Apollo 11, one of the more remarkable results to come out of lunar sample analyses is the hypothesis that a large number of impact events occurred on the Moon during a narrow window in time approximately 3.8 to 4.1 billion years ago (the lunar "cataclysm"). Subsequent work on the lunar and martian meteorite suites; remote sensing of the Moon, Mars, asteroids, and icy satellites; improved dynamical modeling; and investigation of terrestrial zircons extend the cataclysm hypothesis to the Earth, other terrestrial planets, and possibly the entire solar system. Renewed US and international interest in exploring the Moon offers new potential to constrain the Earth-Moon bombardment history. In light of these opportunities, this session invites the latest views on the evidence, timing and mechanism for cataclysmic bombardment of the solar system and its effects on the nascent Earth, including evidence in terrestrial rocks, effects on terrestrial systems (biosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere), and questions that may be answered in a new age of exploration.

This session seeks to foster greater interaction between terrestrial and planetary researchers and learn more about the effects of bombardment on the Earth. The Planetary division of GSA is hosting 18 planetary sessions at this years GSA meeting, and Harrison 'Jack' Schmitt, an Apollo 17 astronaut, will keynote an All-Convention Luncheon on Monday, 6 Oct.

Contributed talks are alloted 15-minute speaking slots. The abstract deadline is June 3. The GSA meeting will take place October 5-9 in Houston, TX.

For more information and how to submit an abstract, please visit http://https://www.acsmeetings.org/


[Source: NAI newsletter]

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